Pineapple Leaf Fibre

OUR PRODUCT CYCLE 

The pineapple leaves used in our products are sourced from Thailand, the world’s fourth largest pineapple* producer at approximately 2.1 million tonnes per year. Thailand is also the world’s top producer of smooth cayenne, a type of pineapple with extra-smooth leaves, yielding superior quality fibres.

The pineapple leaves are purchased from local farmers, helping them earn extra income instead of discarding the leaves as waste. Then, the leaves are processed by decorticating them, degumming them and transforming them into silky-white pineapple leaf fiber (PALF). PALF-blended yarns are used in various textile applications such as apparels, curtains, footwear, upholstery and high-end rug/carpet. 

Through this, we create a circular economy with zero waste, achieving sustainable impact for the environment and for the farmers. 

Pineapple Leaf Fiber (PALF)

Processing of Pineapple Leaves


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From Left to Right:
Photo 1: Collection of leaves after pineapple fruits harvest
Photo 2: Fibre Extraction & Degumming
Photo 3: After degumming: Pineapple leaf fibres (PALF)
Photo 4: Convert PALF to Ready-to-spin fibre and spin to yarn

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PALF Fibres & PALF-blended Fibres (Woven PALF)


Pineapple leaf fibers (PALF) are not a new invention. In the Philippines, traditional luxury textiles were made of PALF and exported to Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries. These were made by traditional craftsmen in small quantities.

Today’s technology means that PALF can be produced using better processing and made accessible to discerning customers. The silky white fibre can easily be dyed and made into a firm fabric that’s softer than hemp, resembling linen. PALF blends well with other materials such as polyester and Tencel to form yarn of different sizes, single or multi-ply. The result: comfortable, eco-friendly apparel, footwear and interiors.

Applications of Woven PALF 


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Apparel & Footwear
The awareness of sustainable textiles is growing rapidly and such textiles include pineapple leaf fibre (PALF). PALF which blends well with polyester and Tencel, is an ecologically friendly plant fibre, for fashionable apparels and trendy footwear. PALF, with its low carbon and water footprint, is a viable sustainable material because it does not compete for resources such additional land and water.

Interiors & Furnishing
PALF-blended yarn is also suitable for eco-texitles for curtains, upholstery and everyday items for sustainable home living.

The Next Step: Non-Woven PALF


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Various Applications including Vegan Leather
We are now researching new ways to create non-woven PALF, a textile that possesses properties of alternate leather. Completely vegan, non-woven PALF can also be used to make a sustainable composite board for building interiors and furnishings.

Pineapple Leaf Fibre (PALF)

Processing of pineapple leaves


Photo 1: Collection of leaves after pineapple fruits harvest

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Photo 2: Fibre Extraction & Degumming

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Photo 3: After degumming: Pineapple leaf fibres (PALF)

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Photo 4: Convert PALF to Ready-to-spin fibre and spin to yarn

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PALF Fibres & PALF-blended Fibres


Pineapple leaf fibers (PALF) are not a new invention. In the Philippines, traditional luxury textiles were made of PALF and exported to Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries. These were made by traditional craftsmen in small quantities.

Today’s technology means that PALF can be produced using better processing and made accessible to discerning customers. The silky white fibre can easily be dyed and made into a stiff  fabric that’s softer than hemp, resembling linen. PALF blends well with other materials such as polyester and Tencel to form yarn of different sizes, single or multi-ply. The result: comfortable, eco-friendly apparel, footwear and interiors.

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Non-Woven PALF


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Various Applications including Vegan Leather
We are now researching new ways to create non-woven PALF, a textile that possesses properties of alternate leather. Completely cruelty-free and vegan, non-woven PALF can also be used to make a sustainable composite board for building interiors and furnishings.

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